30 QUESTIONS INVESTORS ASK DURING FUNDRAISING

30 QUESTIONS INVESTORS ASK DURING FUNDRAISING

by Alex Iskold · in Fundraising, Startup Advice, Venture Capital 

1. Who are your customers, and what problem are you solving for them?

Investors are looking for a simple and clear answer of who you are selling to. They are also looking to understand how clearly you know the pain point, and how big of a problem it is for the customers. This question also opens up a conversation about founder/market fit, as well as helps investors think about the size of the opportunity.

2. What is unique about your solution? What is your unique insight?

Investors want to understand how you are proposing to solve the problem, but more importantly, they are trying to determine whether you have a unique insight. Has anyone else thought about this before? How is it different from other solutions? Do you have a secret? Seriously, investors want to know this because the more differentiated you are the more defensible the business might become in the future.

3. How does your product actually work?

Investors naturally want to see the demo of your product, because a demo is worth a thousand words. A lot of investors want to fund product-obsessed founders; founders who get lost in the details of the product, founders who are super thoughtful and nerdy about features they build, and really understand customer needs. Always show your product to investors with an awesome demo.

4. What are your KPIs? How do you measure growth? How do you know you have product/market fit?

What numbers do you use to drive the business? Lack of clarity or hesitation is a major red flag for investors. If you as a founder arent clear about your metrics or are not measuring the right things, investors wont believe that you can grow the business. Investors want to make sure you understand and measure your conversion and sales funnels, activation, retention, magic moment, churn, CAC, LTV, etc. Investors want to know how you think about KPIs. They will look at your dashboard and will want to understand how you think about growth. They will likely dig in to how you think about attaining product/market fit as well.

5. What is your traction to date?

The question of traction is really two-fold. Of course, investors will first want to know about your traction. But secondly, and more importantly, they will want to understand how you define traction. Many founders mistake progress or effort for traction. On the other hand, investors think of traction as revenue and paying customers or significant growth in weekly and monthly active users.

6. What is the size of this opportunity/total addressable market?

How big is your market? This is a question that matters to a lot of investors. Why? Because VCs economics force them to only focus on very large markets. VCs look for big markets with lots of money so that when they own 20% of your business on exit, they come away with a meaningful enough amount to return all, or at least a sizable portion, of their fund. Otherwise, they dont make money.

In addition, investors expect founders to size up the accessible market, and do the calculation bottom up. Too many founders say they are operating in billion-plus markets without realizing that, because of their business model, they cant be addressed. Spend time sizing up your actual addressable market using your pricing and growth projections.

7. What are your CAC and LTV?

This is another typical question that investors ask founders during each round of financing to establish how fluent they are in the business. In the early days, founders are expected to know the terms, and have an idea of what the numbers are, but its fine to say that you are early, and the numbers are likely to change in the future (typically, CAC goes up and LTV goes down).

The CAC conversation leads to the conversation about channels, marketing, and advertising spend. If you are B2B company with direct sales, you will talk about cost of sales, and how it will change at scale.

Life-time value of the customer is equally important. How long does it take to pay back the amount it cost to acquire this customer? How much money will you make on the average customer? The LTV conversation touches on churn and revenue per customer, and enables investors to understand how you think about your whole customer lifecycle.

8. What is your business model?

Naturally, investors want to understand how you make money. They want to know who your customers are, and how you are planning to charge them. This question combines not just pricing, but strategy and tactics as well. If you make money indirectly, via advertising, investors would then focus on how you acquire customers. If you are a marketplace, the conversation turns to whether you are going after supply or demand and the incentives to be on the platform. What will be the expected average revenue per user? Will you have recurring revenue? All these questions get explored when investors ask about your business model.

9. How did you come up with your pricing?

This is probably a less common question in the early stage, but it is an important one. Investors are looking for you to demonstrate that youve done customer research and competitor research. They are also looking for you to acknowledge that you are early and the pricing is likely to change. In addition, if you are currently free or have a free tier, investors will look to understand when you are planning to get rid of it and what will be the implications.

10. What are your unit economics?

Unit economics give an inductive case for your business. For example, a unit for Uber would be either one ride or one driver, depending on how you model it. The key thing in unit economics analysis is to capture all associated costs and revenues and then see if you are actually making money. Some startups have poor unit economics initially and say they will optimize costs later. Many investors, however, are now wary of this approach because as you scale, new challenges and new, unforeseen costs may arise.

11. What is your go-to-market strategy?

The go-to-market strategy question is a really important one and often is misunderstood. Investors ask this typically when founders say that their product works for everyone. Investors are skeptical, as experience says that focusing on a vertical or a segment is typically better. For example, if you are building developer tools, you could initially focus on freelancers and individual developers. Then once the product is solid, you can move upstream to mid and large enterprises. Tesla had the opposite strategy. It first made a high-end car and has since been moving downstream.

You can also focus on a specific vertical. For example, if you are a security software provider, you can first focus on insurance companies or law enforcement agencies. Having a focus narrows down the opportunity but allows you to really perfect the product and sales. When talking about your go-to-market, investors are really looking to understand your strategy and why you think it will work.

12. What are your customer acquisition and distribution channels?

How are you planning to acquire customers? In the consumer world you have paid and unpaid means. You can advertise or you can use content marketing, social channels, and word of mouth. Investors want to understand how deeply you understand your channels. The challenge is that most obvious channels often do not really work or arent cost effective. That is, when you start, your CAC via Google or Facebook ads is just too high. Investors are looking to understand if you have figured out a growth hack or have an insight on how to acquire customers quickly and efficiently.

In the B2B world, investors want to know if you have an unfair advantage, like youve worked in the space before and have a rich rolodex. They are looking to understand if you are able to secure key partnerships that can help you distribute the product faster and win the market faster.

13. Why now?

This is a question that often goes unasked but is certainly on the investors mind. Timing is everything, and really understanding why now is the time for your company to win is important. The VC industry is full of examples where a product or service was too early or too late and as a result didnt work or didnt get as big as it otherwise could. Before Facebook there was Friendster, before Google there was Alta Vista. Even Uber wasnt the first company to think of on-demand rides, nor was AirBnB the first company to let people host others in their apartments.

Before the current wave of VR and AI, there were at least three other waves. Why do we believe now is different? Why do we believe now it will actually happen? Some argue that we finally have enough cheap computing power and have evolved other key technologies necessary for VR and AI to go mainstream. When investors are asking, Why now,” they are really asking about conditions of the market, context, state of society—dozens of factors that will make a difference between success or failure this time around.

14. Why you? What is YOUR Founder/Market Fit?

Weve written here before about the importance of Founder/Market Fit and most investors pay close attention to it. Investors dont want to fund accidental founders. They want to fund people with deep domain expertise, massive vision, and passion. Investors want to get to the bottom of why you started the business, and whether you have unique insight and unfair advantage.

15. Where did you grow up? Where did you go to school and work before?

In addition to understanding if you know the space, investors want to understand if you are resilient and smart. The question about where you grew up is really a question about how hard you have had to fight through your life to get to where you are. If you grew up in a well-to-do family where you didnt have to struggle, investors may not be as excited about funding you compared to, lets say, an immigrant. There are no hard and fast rules of course, but the environment you grow up in often defines your level of resilience. When things get difficult, and they always do, will you walk away? When you get knocked down, will you get up?

When asked where you went to school, people look to see if you went to a top school, what you studied and what you learned. Sometimes, this conversation leads to a common connection. Sometimes it is just a starting point for learning more about you. Investors are looking to assess your level of intellectual curiosity and honesty.

16. How did you meet your co-founders?

This is another interesting question that doesnt have a clear-cut, right answer, but is telling to investors. If you say you met your co-founders at a hackathon three months ago, what you are saying is that you dont really know each other well. Investors may think that the connection between you isnt solid. If you are saying that you have been friends since high school, investors know that you trust each other. However, they also know that you havent worked together. Friends dont always make the best business partners and startups have ruined thousands of friendships.

Most likely, investors are looking to hear that you worked together before, ideally in another startup and ideally for a while. This would imply that you get along socially, but more importantly, that you can make things together under the stressful environment called a startup.

17. Who are your competitors and how are you different?

Weve written here before how to think about competition. Investors are looking to understand how knowledgable you are about competitors and what is different. If you say you dont have competition or if you bad-mouth the competition, it is a red flag. Simply acknowledge competitors, and highlight what they are doing well. Explain how you are different and why.

18. What is your vision, your true North?

Some founders stumble on this question and this is a red flag for investors, particularly for VCs who want to back founders with a big vision. What do your want your company to be in ten years? This question reveals not only how you think about the business long term, but whether you plan for it to exist for a decade or more. If your plan is to sell quick, you wont have a broad long-tem vision.

Similarly, a question about your true North is an important one. It reveals what you arent willing to compromise on. Great companies are always flexible on their path, but not flexible on the destination.

19. What milestones will you achieve with this financing?

We touched on this topic in our How Much Capital Should you Raise post. This topic is complex and founders often approach it with naiveté. A typical answer might be expressed in terms of specific product milestones and scaling of the team. This is not what investors are looking for. They want to understand tangible business milestones you will reach with the capital you are given.

There are really two outcomes investors are looking for—either profitability, which is very rare in early-stage startups, or the follow-on financing. That is, investors are asking if you will be fundable again once you get funding, execute, and then hit specific milestones. For example, if your plan says you raise $1MM, and then grow 20% MoM to achieve $40K MRR in twelve months, to you this may sound great, but to investors it is clear that it will not be enough to raise series A.

It makes sense to really think through your milestones and where you want to land and why.

20. How much will you be burning in a month?

This is a pretty straightforward question that follows from your financial model. A few things to pay attention to: a) Your HR costs should be roughly 70K-100K per head, b) investors will look for clarity around advertising spend—in the early days, before strong product/market fit, you should not be spending a lot of money to acquire customers, and c) investors will look for any outliers; anything that jumps out as out of the ordinary or unusual.

21. What will be your MoM growth in customers and revenue?

This is another straightforward question based on your financial model. As a startup, you need to make a growth assumption. The trick is that you dont have a ton of historical data to back it up. Whatever data you do have, include it in the model and explain it, because it helps establish credibility. Also, avoid using a cookie-cutter 20% MoM year-round growth assumption, as it may come across as sloppy. Really think through seasonality, and other factors that may influence your growth. Do your customers pay you right away or not? Does your cash in the door trail booked revenue? Reflect all the nuances in the model and your revenue forecast.

22. When will you be profitable?

Historically, many of the best startups have reinvested their revenues into the business and sacrificed profitability in favor of growth. Since the financing market has become tighter, profitability is fashionable again. Becoming profitable is important for many reasons, but the main one is that it allows you to become self-sufficient and control your destiny. When you are profitable, you are no longer in need of external capital in order to survive. Investors are looking to understand how you think about profitability, and tie this to the conversation about your burn and the need for follow-on financing.

23. Why is your business defensible?

VCs want to know what happens to your business over time. Assuming you can get a lift off, investors want to know what will happen in year five, and year ten. Why? Because this is a typical horizon over which more successful startups go public or get acquired for a significant return. Long-term defensibility is difficult to predict. Thats why many investors look for natural monopolies, winner-take-all markets, and businesses with network effects. This is a complex and important topic that is less likely to be top of mind for the founders, but is certainly something investors are paying a lot of attention to.

24. What is your intellectual property?

If you are a startup that is creating new technology, investors want to know about your IP. Are there things here that can be patented? What is the true innovation in your business? While software patents havent been effective in recent years, depending on the type of your business and depending on what kind of investors you are talking to, IP can be an important topic.

25. What is your tech stack?

This question will be particularly relevant for startups that are working in AI, VR, dev tools, and other areas that require deep tech. Some investors, particularly technical ones, will want to nerd out with you on your stack.

26. What are the key risks in your business?

This is one of the hardest questions investors will ask you—why might you fail? This question is a probe for a) how you think about risks in your business, b) do you acknowledge risks, and most importantly, c) are you self-aware and intellectually honest? Great founders bring up and face risks head on. They dont try to shove them under the rug and ignore them.

Risks range vastly from building incorrect products, to the market not being there, to the falling apart of a key distribution deal. Whatever it is, be prepared to talk about risks and show that youve been thinking about them deeply yourself.

27. Who is the natural acquirer for your business?

Investors arent likely to ask you this question, but they will certainly think about it. Investors are putting money into your business to make more money, and historically, since the IPO market is tight, most successful companies are acquired. Although you may have no current plans to sell your company, it is good to think about who might in the future and why.

28. How much capital did you raise so far, and on what terms?

This is a simple question—just tell investors exactly how much you raised, and whether you did it on the note, or via equity. Dont stumble or hesitate, because that could be a red flag.

29. Who are your existing investors?

This is another straightforward question.

30. How much capital are you raising and what are the terms?

You should have clarity on how much you are raising based on the financial model. Depending on where you are in the fundraising process, you may not have

the terms set yet. If you dont have the terms set, then just say so; investors will completely understand.

And now, please tell us what we missed. Share the questions that investors asked you during your fundraising conversations.

 

投資家が資金調達の際に聞く30の質問

資金調達がいかに複雑で、時には混乱するプロセスかを何度か綴っていますが、効率よく資金調達をするためには事前の準備が必要不可欠です。事前準備では投資家の種類や調達したい額はもちろん、投資家のパイプラインを作るのも重要です。

1. 顧客は誰で、彼らのどのような悩みを解決するつもりなのか?
投資家はあなたが誰に価値を提供するつもりなのかを簡潔な答えで求めています。また、彼らはあなたがどれだけ明確にユーザーのペインポイント(悩み)を理解しているかを見ており、その上で悩みの重大さも投資の際の判断材料としています。この質問は起業家・市場フィットの話につながるものでもあり、投資家にあなたのビジネスの可能性を考えさせるいいきっかけになります。

2. あなたの解決案のどこがユニークなのか?あなた独自の考察とは?
投資家はあなたがどのようにしてユーザーの悩みを解決するかだけではなく、むしろそれ以上にあなたに独自の考察があるかを見極めようとしています。他にあなたの解決案を以前思いついた人はいるだろうか?既存の解決案とどう違うのか?あなただけの秘密を持っているだろうか?

投資家はあなたのビジネスが将来どれだけ競争に耐えうるかを知るため、これらの質問の答えを渇望しています。

3. あなたの製品は具体的にどのように機能するのか?
投資家は必然的にあなたの製品のデモをみたがります。なぜなら一文は百閒にしかずだからです。投資家の多くは製品オタクを支援したがります。製品オタクとは、製品の細部を熱烈に語れる起業家のことで、製品の特徴やユーザーのニーズを理解している人を指します。常に投資家に素晴らしいデモを見せられるよう努力しましょう。

4. あなたのビジネスのKPIは?どのように成長を図っているか?どうやってご自分のプロダクトがマーケットに合っているか判断しているか?

あなたは経営判断をする際にどのような指標を見ていますか?この質問に明確な回答を即答できないのは投資家にとっては赤信号同然です。もし創業者のあなたが経営指標を持っていなかったり、誤った指標を見ている場合、投資家としてはスタートアップの可能性を疑わざるえません。投資家はあなたがコンバージョン率やセールスファネル、ユーザーの獲得、維持、マジック・モーメント、離脱率、ユーザー獲得費用、顧客生涯価値等を理解しており、測っているかを知りたいのです。彼らはあなたの測量標を見た上で投資しうるかを考えます。また、彼らはおそらくどのようにあなたが製品・市場のフィットをどう捉えているかも理解しようとします。

5. 今に至るまでのトラクションは?
これは実は二重の質問になっています。もちろん投資家はあなたの今までのトラクションを知ろうとしています。しかしそれに加え、彼らはあなたがトラクションをどう定義しているかも見ています。多くの起業家はトラクションを進展や努力と勘違いしていますが、投資家にとってのトラクションとは売上や有料ユーザー、アクティブ・ユーザーの増加と捉えています。

6. このオポテュニティー(機会)の規模・獲得可能な市場は?
あなたのビジネスにとっての市場規模はいくらくらいだろうか?これは多くの投資家にとって重要な質問です。それはなぜか?ベンチャーキャピタルは運営上大きな市場規模を追い求めるスタートアップにしか投資できないからです。ベンチャーキャピタルはあなたのビジネスの20%と引き換えに投資をすることが多いので、潤沢な資金が集まる大きな市場を目指しているスタートアップでないと元が取れなのです。

さらに、投資家は起業家にボトムアップで市場規模を計算することを期待しています。多くの起業家は「自分は何10億ドルの市場にいる」と主張しますが、ボトムアップで計算するとそうではないことが一目でわかります。実際の市場規模がどの程度のものなのかを価格や成長予想からしっかりと計算しましょう。

7. あなたの顧客獲得コストや顧客生涯価値はいくらだろうか?
これもよく投資家が各ラウンドで起業家の理解を測るためにする質問です。初期の段階でも起業家はこれらの知識を持っていることを期待されますが、これらの数字は今後変化するものとして捉えられています(通常は顧客獲得コストが上がり、顧客生涯価値が下がっていきます)。

顧客獲得コストはチャンネル、マーケティング、営業コストの話に繋がります。もしあなたのビジネスが直接売上のあるB2Bのスタートアップの場合、会話はおのずと営業コストと今後どう変化するかについてのものになるでしょう。

顧客生涯価値も顧客獲得コストと同等に大切です。顧客獲得にかかったコストをどれくらいで取り返せるだろうか?平均的なユーザーにつきどの程度の売上が見込めるだろうか?顧客生涯価値の会話は離脱率や顧客ごとの売上の話とつながっており、あなたがどのようにユーザーのライフサイクルを捉えているかを判断する材料になります。

8. あなたのビジネスモデルについて教えてください
当然、投資家はあなたがどのようにして売上を出しているのかを知りたがります。彼らはあなたの顧客が誰であり、顧客からどのように売上を立てているのか知りたいのです。この質問は価格設定だけではなく、経営戦略と戦術の質問でもあります。もしあなたのビジネスが間接的に広告収入で売上を出しているのであれば、投資家はあなたがどのようにユーザーを獲得しているのかに質問を絞ります。もしあなたのビジネスがプラットフォーム型なのであれば、質問はあなたが需要と供給のどちらを追求しており、どのようなインセンティブ・モデルを考えているかが焦点になります。ユーザーごとに期待できる平均売上はいくらだろうか?それは継続した売上になりうるだろうか?投資家がビジネスモデルについて聞く際、これらのような質問の答えを探しています。

9. どのようにして現在の価格設定に落ち着いたのだろうか?
こちらは他に比べ比較的稀な質問かもしれませんが、重要な質問でもあります。投資家はあなたにユーザーや競合について念入りに調べたことを証明して欲しいのです。また、あなたのビジネスがまだ初期段階であり、今後価格設定が変わる可能性を理解している柔軟さも求めています。もしあなたのビジネスが無料、もしくは無料ユーザーがいる場合、投資家は今後どのようにこれらを排除し売上を伸ばせるかを考えています。

10. あなたのビジネスにとっての経済単位は?
経済単位はあなたのビジネスにとって帰納的な役割を果たします。例えば、UBERにとっての1単位は使用するモデルにより1旅か1運転手になります。経済単位の分析にとって重要なのは関連する売上と費用を含むことおであり、その上でビジネスが利益を出しているかです。スタートアップによっては厳しい利益率に直面しており、これらの創業者は「後で費用を抑える」と言い訳をします。しかし、スタートアップが成長するにつれて新たな課題に直面し、むしろ費用がかさむことが多々あるため、多くの投資家はこの返答に懐疑的です。

11. あなたの市場参入戦略は?

市場参入戦略の質問はとても重要なものですが、多くの企業家が勘違いしてしまうものでもあります。この質問は起業家が「我々の製品は誰にでも向いているものです」と主張する際に飛んでくるものですが、投資家というのは懐疑的な集団であり、経験上特定のセグメント絞ることの大切さを理解しています。例えばもしあなたがデベロッパーのためのツールを作っている場合、まずはフリーランスや個人デベロッパーに焦点を当ててみてもいいかもしれません。次に製品の内容が固まった後、より上流の大手企業に進出するのが妥当でしょう。Teslaはこれの逆を行い、まずハイエンドの車を作った上で大衆車の製品化を試みました。

市場参入戦略ではセグメントではなく、特定の垂直な市場に絞るのも一つの手です。例えばもしあなたの会社がセキュリティソフトの制作会社であれば、まずは保険業界や政府系にまず注力するのがいいかもしれません。垂直な市場に絞ることで市場は狭まりますが、逆にその産業に特化した製品と営業戦略を作ることが可能です。投資家が市場参入戦略について質問をする場合、彼らはあなたがしっかりと根拠のある戦略を持っているかを判断しようとしています。

12. あなたのユーザー獲得・流通チャンネルについて教えてください
あなたはどのようにユーザーを獲得しようと考えていますか?消費者の世界では費用がかかるユーザー獲得方法と費用がかからない方法があります。有料な手法として広告を打つことも可能ですが、同時にお金がかからない方法としてコンテントマーケティング、ソーシャルメディアでの拡散、WoM(口づてでの拡散)が挙げられます。投資家はあなたがこれらのチャンネルについてどれだけ熟知しているのかをこの質問で判断しようとしています。マーケティングの難しいところは一番理論的な答えが実は効果が薄かったり、非効率だったりすることです。これは起業当初にかかるGoogle ads Facebook ads の費用が高すぎることなどが例として挙げられます。投資家はあなたがグロース・ハックの仕組みを見出した、もしくは効率よくユーザーを獲得するユニークな手法を持っているかを知りたがっています。

B2Bの世界ではあなたがその業界で職務経験があるかや、強い繋がりを有しているかなど、あなた本人の資質が直接問われています。投資家はあなたが製品の普及を競合よりも有利に進めるための業務提携をするためのネットワークを持っているかを問いています。

13. なぜ今?
この質問はあまり聞かれませんが必ず投資家の頭の中にはよぎる質問です。スタートアップはタイミングが全てであり、あなたのビジネスに適しているのが今であるという確証を彼らはもとめています。VCの業界では早すぎたり遅すぎたりで失敗するビジネスは日常茶飯事です。Facebookの前にはFriendsterがありましたし、Googleの前にはAlta Vistaがありました。Uberでさえもオンデマンド・ライドの発案者ではありませんし、AirBnBにも先駆者がいました。

現在のVRAIの流行が来る前に、少なくとも似たような流行が3度はありました。ではなぜ、今度は違うと言い切れるのでしょうか?多くの起業家はやっとVRAIが主流になるための技術的基盤が整ったと主張しています。投資家が「なぜ今?」と質問する場合は、今度こそ成功するという確信を市場の動向、技術的基盤、社会のニーズ等、様々な角度から答える必要があります。

14. なぜあなたなのか?あなたの創業者/マーケットフィットは?
上記でも触れましたが多くの投資家は創業者と市場のフィット(相性)を重視しています。投資家は偶然成功する一発屋は探しておらず、深い専門性、大きなヴィジョン、そして情熱を持った起業家を求めています。彼らはあなたがなぜこのビジネスを始めようと思ったかを深堀りしますし、あなたの起業家としての比較優位性を判断しようとしています。

15. 生い立ちや学歴・職歴など、あなた今までについて教えてください。
投資家はあなたの業界の知見に加え、あなたの賢さや打たれ強さを知りたがっています。この質問はあなたが今までの人生でどこまで努力してきたかを測るためのものです。もしあなたが裕福な生い立ちで苦労なく今の立場にたどり着いたのであれば、逆境の人生を歩んできた移民のような人に投資したがるかもしれません。もちろん一概にいえませんが、人は生い立ちで打たれ強さがある程度決まるところがあります。もしあなたがスタートアップで逆境に直面した際(逆境は必ず訪れます)、あなたはそれに立ち向かうことができるでしょうか?倒された時も立ち上がることができますでしょうか?

投資家があなたの学歴について聞く際はあなたが有名大学に行ったか、そこで何を勉強し学んだかを知ろうとしています。これは時に投資家とあなたの共通点を探すためのものであり、時にあなたの知的好奇心や素直さをみようとしています。

16. コーファウンダーにはどのようにして出会いましたか?
こちらも明確な正解がない質問の一つですが、投資家にあなたのスタートアップの裏にあるストーリーを知ってもらういい機会です。もしあなたがコーファウンダーと3ヶ月前にハッカソンで会ったと伝えてしまえば、彼らは二人の関係が浅いもので信頼関係が構築されていないと考えます。逆にあなたがコーファウンダーと高校来の親友であると伝えれば、信頼関係はあるが一緒に仕事をした仲ではないと考えます。無二の親友が無二のコーファウンダーになる例は少なく、過去に共に起業したことで友人を失った話は枚挙にいとまがありません。

投資家にとって理想的な回答は、信頼関係の構築されている同僚であることです。一緒に働いていたのがスタートアップであればなお良いでしょう。これはスタートアップという様々な困難が待ち構えている環境に共に立ち向えることを示しているからです。

17. あなたの競合はどこで、あなたは彼らとどう違いますか?
以前こちらに競合についてどう考えるべきかを書きましたが、投資家はこの質問であなたがライバルについてどれだけ知っているかを判断しようとしています。もしあなたが「競合はいない」と答えたり、相手のことを悪く言うとこれは赤信号です。まずは完結に競合の存在を認め、彼らの秀でている点を述べましょう。次にあなたのビジネスがライバルとどう違い、なぜ違うのかを説明しましょう。

18. あなたのビジョン、北極星はなんですか?
起業家によってはこの質問につまずくことがあり、投資家はこれを赤信号と捉えます。特にあなたのビジョンが壮大なものであればなおさらです。あなたの会社の10年後の将来像はありますか?この質問はあなたが長期的な目線で会社を見ているかだけではなく、そもそも10年以上存続させるつもりがあるかも見定めています。もしあなたが短期で売却つもりなら、ここでボロが出てしまうでしょう。

同様に、あなたにとっての北極星を問う質問も重要です。この質問はあなたが譲れないものを見極めるためのものです。成功する会社は進路は柔軟に決めますが、目的地は定まっています。

19. この資金調達でどのようなマイルストーン(目標)が達成されますか?
こちらについてはいくら資金調達をするべきかで触れましたが、多くの起業家が曖昧な答えをする質問です。典型的なのはチームの増員や製品に関するマイルストーンですが、投資家が求めているのはより具体的なビジネスにおけるマイルストーンです。

この質問を聞く際、投資家が求めているのは利益(アーリーステージではなかなか難しいですが)か追加資金調達のどちらかです。つまり、投資家はこの資金調達を通じて次のステージにいくだけのマイルストーンを達成しうるかを判断しようとしています。例えばあなたの事業計画が$100万の資金調達を目指しており、12ヶ月で月刊経常収益$4万を達成するために月間成長率20%を目指しているとします。あなたにとっては充分な内容かもしれませんが、投資家彼みればシリーズAの資金調達をすることができないのは明白です。

この質問はあなたにどこになぜマイルストーンを定めるのかを考える機会になるのではないでしょうか。

20. 月間資本燃焼率はいくらですか?
こちらはあなたのファイナンシャル・モデルについての簡潔な質問です。この質問を答える際に気にかけるべきは以下の3点です。まず、人件費は一人当たり$7~$10万程度です。次にアーリステージのスタートアップに対して投資家はまず製品と市場がフィットしているかを見極めようとし、マーケティング費用について厳しく追求します。むしろユーザー獲得に多くのお金をかけるべきではありません。最後に投資家は通常とは異なる費用について追求するでしょう。

21. ユーザー数と売上の月間成長率の予測を教えてください。
こちらもあなたのファイナンシャル・モデルに関する簡潔な質問です。スタートアップとして成長予測を立てるの非常に重要です。問題は予測の根拠とできるデータが限られていることにあります。あるデータは全てモデルに組み込み、説明することで信憑性を高めましょう。また、定型の月間成長率20%モデルは初心者用なので避けましょう。季節などあなたのビジネスを影響しうる全ての要素を加味したモデルを作ることが重要です。ユーザーはどれくらいでお金を払うようになるのか?会計上時差が発生しないか?このような細かい情報もモデルに反映させましょう。

22. いつ黒字化しますか?
数年前までは多くのスタートアップが利益よりも成長を優先し、売上を再投資していました。しかし、経済の雲行きが怪しくなったこともあり、ここ数年投資家は利益を重視するようになっています。黒字化するのは様々な意味で大切なことですが、あなたにとって一番大事なのは自分の運命を自分で決められるということです。黒字化すればあなたは外部の資本に頼らず会社を運営することができます。投資家はこの質問を通じてあなたが黒字化についてどのように考えているかを見極めようとしています。また、この質問は資本燃焼率や追加増資につながるものでもあります。

23. あなたのビジネスは競合に耐えられますか?
ベンチャーキャピタルはあなたの企業の長期的な成長を願っています。目先の利益が上げられたとしても、5年、10年後はどうなっているでしょうか?長期的成長を予想するのはとても難しいものです。それもあって、投資家は自然な独占市場やネットワーク効果があるビジネスを求めています。この質問は複雑であまり聞かれませんんが、投資家が間違いなく気にかけている点の一つです。

24. あなたが有している知的財産について教えてください。
もしあなたのスタートアップが新しいテクノロジーを開発しているのであれば、投資家はあなたがもっているであろう知的財産について興味を示します。あなたの技術で特許を申請できるものはあるだろうか?あなたのビジネスの中で真に革新的なのはなんだろうか?近年ソフトウェア関連の特許は芳しい成果を出していませんが、あなたのビジネスの内容や投資家によっては知的財産は相変わらず重要なトピックです。

25. あなたのスタートアップで使用しているソフトウェアやプログラミング言語について教えてください
この質問はAIAR、開発ツールなど、深い専門技術が必要なスタートアップにとって重要な質問です。投資家、特にSEあがりの投資家はあなたの使用言語について根掘り葉掘り聞いてきます。

26. あなたの会社にとって大きいリスクについて教えてください
何がうまくいかなければあなたは失敗するだろうか?これは投資家が聞く中でもっとも難しい質問の1つです。この質問は以下の3点について考えるためのものです。まず、あなたがリスクのことをどう考えているか。次に、リスクの存在を認めるか。そして、これらに関して自覚を持っており、素直に受け止められるか。成功を収める起業家はリスクを自ら話題に出し、これらを真っ向から迎え撃ちます。リスクを無視して隠そうとするのは避けるべきです。

リスクはユーザーのニーズにあっていない製品を作ってしまったり、市場が存在しなかったり、要となる案件が通らなかったりと様々です。リスクがなんであれ、投資家の前でそれを話しどうやって抑えるかを日々考えていることを証明しましょう。

27. あなたのスタートアップを買収する企業があるとすればどこになると思いますか?
投資家が真っ向からこの質問をすることはまれですが、間違いなく頭の中では考えていることの1つです。投資家は利益を上げるために投資をするのであり、IPO市場が厳しい現状、多くの成功したスタートアップは他社の買収されます。アーリステージだと自分の会社を売ることなど想像できないかもしれませんが、考え始めるに越したことはありません。

28. 今までどのような条件の資金調達を行いましたか?
これはよく聞かれる簡単な質問です。素直に投資家に今まで調達した額と株式、コンバーチブル・ノートどちらで受け取ったかを伝えましょう。変につまずいたり躊躇するのは投資家にとっては赤信号です。

29. 現在あなたに投資している投資家について教えてください。
28と同様、単純明快な質問です。

30. どのような条件でいくらの資金調達を目指していますか?
ファイナンシャル・モデルからどれだけ資金調達をする必要があるのかは明確なはずです。資金調達の初期段階の場合、条件はまだ定まっていないかもしれません。そういう場合は素直にまだわからないと伝えましょう。投資家も理解してくれます。

Link:
https://alexiskold.net/…/30-questions-investors-ask-during…/

#StartupFire 関連プロモーション イベント 

* #StartupFire Family の皆さまには特別イベントご招待や割引もございます。ご連絡お待ちしております。

3月21日 銀座:GIP (Global Innovator Program)

3月22日 東京大学:Teamz Business Summit

3月23日 東京 シャングリラホテル: Teamz Redcarpet

3月28日 東京 ダイアゴナルラン: 起業の科学〜スタートアップを成功に導く10の極意〜

3月28日29日 東京 ビッグサイト:Slush Tokyo 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *